The Language Of Composition Rhetoric Terms

Paradox – A seemingly contradictory statement that turns out to have a perfectly logical meaning.
antithesis – A balancing of two opposite of contrasting words, phrases, or clauses
undersatement – the opposite of exaggeration…a technique for developing irony and/or humor where one writes or says less than intented
Speaker – The voice of a work; an author may speak as himself/herself or as a fictitious persona.
Sermon – An oration by a prophet or member of the clergy
Metaplasmus – Any alteration in the form of the word, in particular the addition, subtraction, or substitution of letters or sounds, resulting in a misspelling; there are four different ways to misspell: addition, omission, substitution, and rearrangement.
epitaph – a piece of writing in praise of a deceased person
Parallelism – recurrent syntactical similarity; several parts of a sentence(s) expressed similarly
Ambiguity – An event or situation that may be interpreted in more than one way. Also, the manner of expression of such an event or situation may be ambiguous. Artful language may be ambiguous. Unintentional ambiguity is usually vagueness.
Cacophony – loud confusing disagreeable sounds
Oxymoron – a paradox that combines terms normally seen as opposites
Allusion – A figure of speech which makes brief, even casual to a historical or literary figure, event, or object to create a resonance in the reader or to apply as a symbolic meaning to the character or object of which the allusion consists.
freight-train – sentence consisiting 3 or + very short independent clauses joined by conjuctions
concrete language – Language that described specific, observable things, people or places rather than ideas or qualities
Parallelism – recurrent syntactical similarity; several parts of a sentence(s) expressed similarly

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